Author Topic: Do you put a surge protector on your fridge?  (Read 1457 times)

Baylor3217

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Do you put a surge protector on your fridge?
« on: May 05, 2013, 06:13:03 pm »
My repair man swore by it.

Surge protect the whole house?

ketchup

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Re: Do you put a surge protector on your fridge?
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2013, 08:07:17 pm »
I only ever put surge protectors on my computers (UPSes here too) and consumer electronics (TV, video games, etc).  I haven't ever thought of putting one on appliances but I could see that making complete sense.

The only person I've known that has lost anything to a power surge is my grandma.  She had a VCR get hosed a few years back.  Luckily, it was 2010, so she didn't need a new one.

MountainFlower

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Re: Do you put a surge protector on your fridge?
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2013, 10:03:55 pm »
Whole house.  It wasn't that expensive.  We're the highest thing on the top of a hill at high altitude (wicked lightening storms) and we've been hit by lightening more than once.  We lost two computers in one day, so we had to do something! 

Vilx-

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Re: Do you put a surge protector on your fridge?
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2013, 12:55:43 am »
If I had a house, I too would probably put a surge protector on the entire house. I only have lost a wifi router, but I have at least two relatives who have each lost a computer to lightning. Other devices don't seem to be so much affected by them, but you can never know.

Also, I'd put the advanced circuit breakers with... I don't know what is it called - "leak detection"? I can't find anything in Google on that, so I guess it has a different name in English.

The idea is - normal circuit breakers only trip if there is a short-circuit anywhere (which results in HUGE power consumption which is then what triggers the breaker). But the advanced one also compares the "incoming" and "outgoing" currents and trips if there is a significant difference. So if someone accidentally touches something with voltage and gets a shock, the circuit breaker trips too and prevents further electrical injury to the person.

I don't know how it is in the USA, but around here these things are not very popular. Sometimes even the salespeople don't know that they are selling them! :D One way to tell is that the "normal" breakers are usually about $10-$20, while the advanced ones are over $60 (at least here where I live).

So, yes, they are significantly more expensive, but also not THAT much expensive, and they DO save lives.

Spork

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Re: Do you put a surge protector on your fridge?
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2013, 09:08:23 am »

I keep meaning to put in a whole house surge protector.  As far as I know that's the only way to protect 240v appliances (which now seem to have delicate computer boards in them).

Installation looks painfully easy.  (It's just an additional circuit.)  I am not entirely sure if I need to upgrade my grounding in order to do it.

It also seems like a good thing to have if you're investing $10 or more on energy efficient LED bulbs that are (presumably) full of fragile circuitry, the whole house surge might be good insurance.

BlueMR2

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Re: Do you put a surge protector on your fridge?
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2013, 10:13:56 am »
I don't bother.  The whole house surge protection is interesting, but we really don't have any issues with surges on the incoming AC lines (despite lots of lightning) here in Ohio.  I've got an antenna tower as well, but surge protection of appliances/AC power doesn't really do anything for you in that case.  For that case what's required (and what I have) is a fully bonded ground system with multiple ground rods.  Only surge suppression devices I use are on the antenna cabling at the entryway box.  The idea is to give a low impedance path to ground for strikes and eliminate internal voltage differentials (a little redundant, since that's what voltage is, a differential) by allowing the whole system to float at the same potential.